While BARC’s primarily focus is dogs, we find it difficult to say no to any animal in need! So when calls to help monkeys came in we went into action. Eventually establishing a monkey habitat up at the Sanctuary land that is currently home to our primate friends. We offer a huge thank you to Dick Smith Electronics along with our amazing supporters – who made this possible!

For now, we are not taking in any more of our primate friends, instead working with other organizations to facilitate their rescue and care. The current group have all healed from their injuries and formed a close knit community, therefore it is not possible to introduce any new rescues into the troop.

While we were looking into returning them to the wild, recent news would suggest that this may not be possible. We are currently looking into the possibilities of some habitat population research. But for the moment, due to overpopulation of the monkeys in Bali, reduced suitable locations for release and difficulties in obtaining a release permit – our monkey troop look like they will be remaining in their purpose built enclosure.

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Subscribing as a weekly or monthly donor will help us cover the cost associated with the care and feeding of our primate residents. In return for your generous donation you will receive quarterly updates and news on what is happening for our monkey friends at the BARC Sanctuary – Warriors Legacy.

FEED THE MONKEYS

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MEET A COUPLE OF OUR PRIMATE RESIDENTS:

LILLY LOCKS


A tiny baby monkey when she initially arrived for sale at the dreaded Denpasar Bird Market. As the months went on, she grew larger in size and learned to defend herself from the constant jeering crowd and those who would torment her.

This behavior earned her the title of “aggressive”. As such, she was placed into a tiny cage with an even shorter 15cm chain, shoved in a dark corner without any stimulation.

Quizzed about their plans for her life, the sellers answered with chilling indifference, “stay there”. BARC intervened, paying $30 Australian dollars for her release. We shudder to think of what would have happened to her had we not discovered her plight…she was in that cage, unable to stand up for five months. Imagine if we had not discovered her?

SCULLY


This poor girl had been scalped at the time of her rescue! A huge open wound exposing the skull, having been cut with a knife. Her ears had also been cut off. At first it was believed the head wound was the result of an aggressive capture. However specialists later advised she was being prepared for a meal – fresh Monkey Brain – a popular delicacy in Jakarta.

Understandably, she came to BARC with severe trauma, but after much rehabilitation and care she is enjoying some freedom and joy with the other monkeys in the rehab center. She is distinguishable from the others because of the huge head scar and missing ears.

ROCKY


Rocky lived a very tough life before coming to BARC. Stolen from mother in the jungle as a baby she was given as a gift to a person with no experience handling or rearing monkeys. As such, she spent the first 15 years of her life in solitude with nothing but the concrete floor beneath her.

Her first experience of climbing trees and swinging from branches was at the BARC Sanctuary – and as you can imagine this was a joyous day for her!

As Rocky is domesticated, we cannot release her into the wild for her own safety – so this girl will remain at the Sanctuary for the rest of her life. Not a bad place to be swinging from the trees!

BUBBLES

Watch a short video of Bubbles during her recovery from tetanus


Bubbles is a long tailed macaque, one of the monkeys that are native to Bali.

Some tourists stumbled across her living in a small cage in the rubbish dump behind a Hindu temple. They felt not to just leave her there, so went in search of help, but unfortunately no one would! Luckily they found BARC.

The next day we went in search of bubbles story and why she was now living in the rubbish dump. It turned out that 18 months before, she had appeared there as an adult monkey. She was so friendly, she was jumping all over people while they were trying to do their ceremonies at the temple. The priest from the temple said that the people were upset and to get her out of their way they stuck her in a cage.

The problem was that the cage was very small and had no shelter from the elements. In order to feed herself, Bubbles would pull plastic bags from the rubbish dump into her cage and sort through to find edible scraps. This is no way for a monkey to live!

As if she had not been through enough by this stage, she then suffered from tetanus. Tetanus, as we discovered has a 99% death rate, but amazingly enough after 2 weeks of 24hr care by Linda, the advice of Australian vets and Indonesian doctors (not to mention a whole heap of prayers and faith) – she survived!

Now Bubbles is with the other monkeys up at the Sanctuary. Unfortunately Bubbles will never be able to be released into the wild. She is just too domesticated.

She is super smart, mischievous and quite jealous of the things she considers ‘hers’ – people included!! Her favourite past time – given the opportunity – is fostering young kittens and puppies… she even taught one puppy to eat bananas!

FEED THE MONKEYS

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